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December 14, 2009

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Ray Girvan

Mind you, ballet always has been astonishingly conservative. With "The Rite of Spring" people were as much horrified by the strange footwork as by the music and pagan/erotic content, and Vaughan Williams went through immense hassle to make sure that "Job: A Masque for Dancing" wasn't danced on points.

As to the main point, it's a pity that the reality of brilliant, and later validated, ideas being rejected so easily leads to the fallacious position - adopted by every paranoid twit with a quack theory - that rejection is a proof of brilliance and future validation.

Jeff

Thanks. I shall include this post with my next application to the Patent Office for one of my perpetual motion machines. It just infuriates me that they're so short-sighted and pig-headed. I don't know what that Ray guy is talking about.

John Ptak

RAY: Sometimes its just hard to see the future, even when its right there in front of you. SO far as paranoid twit quack theorists go, well, I think they're into it for the (1) the rejection, or (2) the comraderie of the League of the Rejected, or (3) the possibility for landing their own late-night am talk show.

JEFF: please be advised I charge 10 cents for each time this post is used at the Patent/Trademark Office. Just tape the dime > and send it along as necessary.

Alejandra

Hi. I find your blog very interesting. I've researching Schlemmer's Triadic Ballet for a while and I totally agree with your post. But I want you to know that the videoclips you found in Youtube are NOT from 1927. They belong to a reconstruction realized in 1970 by Margarete Hastings; Schlemmer was already dead. If you want to see a clip from the original Triadic Ballet, filmed in the 30's, you can see it here: http://triadicos.wordpress.com/la-pelicula-original-2/
They are only a few seconds, taken from a documentary on German dance.

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