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September 24, 2008

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Jeff

I couldn't help but think of "A Pattern Language" when I saw the pictures. It's one of my all-time favorite books. The beginning of the books deals with large patterns -- city and town level -- and the drawings are much more organic than these, but I can understand Ol' Eb's desire to find the structure for perfect happiness. Of course, it's forever elusive, but I think the "Pattern Language" folk are close.

John Ptak

Thanks Jeff! Another insightful response, as always. The Christopher Alexander book is spot on: "A Pattern Language" has been an important and influential book. As a matter of fact, my 16-year old Emma is sitting just to my right, right now, having her very first go at SPORE, Will Wright's new evolutionary/universalist mind blower...and it seems that Wright has written or at least spoken to Alexander's influence on his work.

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