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March 30, 2008

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jasper

It is interesting where Herzog's inspiration comes from. His film is rooted in history but it is also rooted in his fascination with the neolithic standing stones that one finds in France and the U.K..

Kinski was a tad on the peculiar side... but the same can probably be said of Herzog himself. He has claimed that a leader of one of the indigenous tribes offered to kill Kinski. He turned him down because filming had not been completed.

Rick

I enjoyed this post man's various efforts, real and imagined, to conquer the comparatively narrow bit of land separating the two great oceans. The recommendation to avoid high speed while towing/pushing huge ocean-going vessels across the Nicaraguan route makes one wonder if Eads may have paid Sir Edward too much, regardless of what he paid him. Sir Edward was former master engineer of the British navy, but he was still an active master of the obvious.

The interesting choice you made to use "irreproachable" in defining the sanitary conditions and available medical care during the French disaster of a canal attempt puzzled me at first. Then, after thinking about it, I decided I could get behind this new use of the word. It is most-typically used in situations to indicate someone has done such a good job or something was so perfect for its role that the person or thing is beyond reproach. Here, it is exactly the opposite: the situation was so horrible for the workers, that reproach would not be strong enough condemnation; the situation was beyond that, or irreproachable.

There's always the chance that you could simply have meant a different word and that this one was accidentally put onto the screen by rebellious fingers, but I'll go with my explanation until the truth comes out.

jon swan

Hmm ... you start by saying Fitzcarraldo is a Wim Wenders film then mention Herzog - thus correcting yourself. But will you edit out Wenders and replace with the correct Werner Herzog in the beginning or am I missing something.....?

John PTak

Mea culpa! THanks Joe.

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